body

Events

September 10, 2020
  • Art and Environmentalism from an Indigenous Perspective


    September 10, 2020  4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
    zoom

    Art and Environmentalism from an Indigenous Perspective

    Description
    Ranco’s talk will focus on how her ancestral connectivity to the Penobscot Bay region has influenced her artwork and passion for environmentalism. She will discuss the collective responsibility of Land Trusts to not only ensure this homeland will be protected, but to give voice and access to the Indigenous people who still cherish this land.

    Bio 

    Ann Pollard Ranco has been a professional artist since the age of 13. She began her career as a jeweler, collecting discarded pieces of pottery and glass from the banks of the Penobscot River and watershed, and turning them into wearable pieces of jewelry. Last year, she began painting, and has found that through a mixed media approach, art offers a vehicle to discuss broader topics that are not often bridged. Her work is represented in the Abbe Museum, and at various art shows throughout the state.

    This is the 18th in the webinar Series cohosted by BHHT and Island Heritage Trust, featuring local naturalists, professionals from environmentally focused organizations, and outdoor learning experts to share their knowledge, virtually, during a time when we can’t all be out in the field together.
    The webinars take place LIVE every Thursday from 4-5pm! We will record the webinar so that if you wish to view but can’t participate at that time, the presentation will be available to you on our websites and social media.

    Click the link below to REGISTER for this webinar:
    https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_xAnF3ypITz60V2Ja2vDLPA
    Email questions to Landere : [email protected]

September 17, 2020
  • Mushrooms in Maine: Good, Bad, and Beautiful


    September 17, 2020  4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
    zoom

    David Porter, retired from the Univ of Georgia, moved to Brooklin 14 years ago. He enjoys sharing his fascination with the natural history of mushroom fungi, and before the pandemic has led forays and offered classes with BHHT, IHT, CoA and Eagle Hill.

    In recent years mushroom fungi have garnered increased recognition of their beneficial role in forest ecology. Mushrooms may be decomposers while others cooperate with trees for mutual benefit and communication.  Interest in gathering wild foods has popularized foraging for edible mushrooms as well as the importance of recognizing those that may be poisonous.  Natural history and edibility aside, mushrooms are organisms of remarkable beauty that are often underappreciated.  We will share personal observations and scientific information in this illustrated talk to stimulate your curiosity and lower your gaze during your walk in the woods.

    This is the 19th in our webinar Series cohosted by BHHT and Island Heritage Trust, featuring local naturalists, professionals from environmentally focused organizations, and outdoor learning experts to share their knowledge, virtually, during a time when we can’t all be out in the field together.
    The webinars take place LIVE every Thursday from 4-5pm! We will record the webinar so that if you wish to view but can’t participate at that time, the presentation will be available to you on our websites and social media.
    Click the link below to REGISTER for this webinar:

    https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_MsCdt_zdTMipDrkzwS1ZXg

    Email questions to Landere : [email protected]

September 25, 2020
  • Maine Outdoor Film Festival


    September 25, 2020
    Fort Knox and Penobscot Narrows Observatory, 740 Ft Knox Rd, Prospect, ME 04981, USA

September 2020

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
  • Art and Environmentalism from an Indigenous Perspective
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
  • Mushrooms in Maine: Good, Bad, and Beautiful
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
  • Maine Outdoor Film Festival
26
27
28
29
30